Monthly Archives: April 2011

Wind Under their Wings:

Wind gust in the northPhoenix area started to hit the 45-50mph mark Friday afternoon pushing through the night into Saturday morning at times sounding like thunder.

You could see the shadows passing over the small yard and the dogs started to bark with a purpose.  It wasn’t until we looked out the bedroom door that we saw two mallards taking refuge from the wind in the pool that we knew the reason.

Pool ducks take flight in strong Phoenix winds.

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A Shadow Never Leaves:

“All that we are is the result of what we have thought. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him. If a man speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows him, like a shadow that never leaves him.”
-Buddha- 

Shadows found in pool or mountain pass.

Palm Shandow


Sasha and the Pink Pig:

Sasha and friend.

 

As a photographer it’s a pivotal moment when you know that your subject is relaxed and comfortable with their surroundings, that they almost forget they are being photographed.

That precise second where they are truly themselves is magical and can not be duplicated. For some subjects it is the tunes of their choice; music in the background or a classic Sauvignon…for others, a stuffed pink pig.


Hot Air Balloons: A Phoenix Easter

 

“THE BALLOON SEEMS TO STAND STILL IN THE AIR WHILE THE EARTH FLIES PAST UNDERNEATH!”

-Alberto Santos-Dumont-

Tours from Hot Air Expeditions are seen daily above Phoenix. Pefect for your bucket list http://www.hotairexpeditions.com/


Easter Portraits and Control:

Shooting with the Lensbaby is somewhat a “leap-of-faith” at the very least you have to be able to just set your need to control every aspect of photography on the shelf.

The magic of creating an image for you is exactly that…fun it goes back to the beauty of watching a print come to life in a shallow tray of Dektol and then making refinements under the enlarger, never really knowing exactly how it is going to come out until you move it from the bath to the fixer.

The Lensbaby composer can offer some extremely sharp portraits or those that have such shallow depth-of-field that it makes the viewer uneasy.

Whether you’re photographing the children or the family pets over the Easter Holiday take the time to play and create without restrictions.  Resist the temptation to reach for the “control” you’ve place on the back shelf…at least for the day.


Old School Leica:

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There is just something soothing about holding a piece of camera equipment that is as finely crafted as a Swiss watch but solid enough to pound a nail through an oak plank.

I have spent the last twenty-two years developing programs and purchasing digital camera equipment at four newspapers and feel I have an insider’s appreciation for both the quality and economic value of today’s digital visual products…but.

…There is nothing like an “Old School Leica” film camera to give you an appreciation for high-end optics and the refinement of an M-3 body with Leitz Summicron 50mm/f2 lens. The pair was manufactured a year after I was born in 1956 and with a minor dent and some scratches; it’s a working machine much like the owner.

No winder; no auto-focus; no light meter; and a rewind knob that you actually have to turn; just add black and white film.


Desert Life:

  Hummingbird shows us how to re-visit the past for the purpose of releasing it instead of being caught in a permanently backward flight pattern. It also helps us to see that if we step aside we may see our life differently. Hummingbird teaches us to transcend time, to recognize that what has happened in the past and what might happen in the future is not nearly as important as what we are experiencing now. It teaches us to hover in the moment, to appreciate its sweetness.-Constance Barrett Sohodski- 

Hummingbird nesting on two jelly bean sized eggs.

 


Returning to the Alps

Stuart Fork of the Trinity Alps meets Trinity Lake. CA 2011

 The lakes are something which you are unprepared for; they lie up so high, exposed to the light, and the forest is diminished to a fine fringe on their edges, with here and there a blue mountain, like amethyst jewels set around some jewel of the first water, – so anterior, so superior, to all the changes that are to take place on their shores, even now civil and refined, and fair as they can ever be. 

-Henry David Thoreau-


A Walk Along the Sacramento:


A Time for Beauty:

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul. 

-John Muir-


A Bird on the Head is Worth?

Sharon Dale, Curator of the Turtle Bay Animal Program watch as a young Lorikeet finds a landing spot after being released in their new habitat.

Parents and children from Buckeye School of the Arts were on hand to watch the release of Lorikeets at Turtle Bay.

Lorikeet getting acclimated to his new home at Turtle Bay.

Phase one of releasing two groups of Lorikeets into their new home at Turtle Bay was accomplished Thursday morning.  The thirteen medium-sized; rainbow-colored parrots will be joined by the second group of fourteen in a week after acclimation to their newly renovated habitat.  The Lorikeets are raised in captivity and come from two certified breeders in Florida and Texas. Visitors to Turtle Bay will be able to walk through the new exhibit starting April 16th.  The official opening will be in May after all the birds have had time to settle in to their new home. Lorikeets are known for their bottlebrush-tipped tongues used to feed on nectar and soft fruits.