Monthly Archives: March 2011

PHOTO STUFF TO REMEMBER:

“ENGAGE DON’T ALIENATE!”

I tend to pull these out as a reminder from time to time since I have a good memory……just short!

Fifteen ways to determine the look of your photograph

  1. Rule of thirds
  2. Linear perspective
  3. Framing
  4. Silhouette
  5. The decisive moment
  6. Selective focus
  7. Dominant foreground/contributing background
  8. Controlled depth of field
  9. Introducing disorder into a controlled situation
  10.  Texture
  11.  Juxtaposition
  12.  Reflection
  13.  Panning
  14.  Perspective/context
  15.  Lighting as a creative device
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An Afternoon with Edith:

Aunt Edith born in 1916 "Hell, you do the math."

Without a doubt every visit starts out with me asking Edith how she is doing and her standard reply is “I’m getting old!” and my reply is normally “Well no shit Edith your ninety-five years old and you have a stainless steel knee that won’t bend leaving you much like the tin-man in the wizard of oz without the oil can.”  This is always met with an Edith impish smile.

Edith Robertson is Anne’s aunt but I’ve been claiming her for my own for the past thirty-five years.  She is pretty sure that I only love her for her fortune but you can’t put a price on that spirit she brings to the table.  She is diamond tough with a heart that packs the same brilliance.

Edith was born in 1916 a year before the start of the First World War; they called it the big one.  It was the start of the Great Migration when blacks started to move from the rural South to the urban North to escape a culture of slavery and racism. There were jobs in the North and Chicago was a boomtown producing goods that Europeans could no longer build while fighting a war. This really has no bearing on your life when you’re growing up in Dawson, New Mexico a place that God couldn’t find on the map.

If asking about her age you will hear “I was born in 1916, hell you do the math.”

I enjoy these visits as they are a reminder to take each day as they come; stay tough; and keep looking for that fortune.


Remembering Cesar Chavez:

Retired Spanish Professor Salvador Valdivia

The wonderful thing about photojournalism is the opportunity to meet truly inspirational people. The down-side is that you step into their lives for short periods of time and it’s rare that you have an opportunity to spend time with them again.  So is true this past Sunday with Salvador Valdivia a retired Spanish professor from Shasta College located in Redding, CA.

Our connection was really not on a subject to journalist level but that as parents.  We both were raised at a time when going to work in the fields was considered a career.  We both took pride in the fact that our children had an opportunity to further their education over their parents.

“My father taught me a valuable lesson when I was a young boy by taking me and my brothers to Yuba City in the summer heat to pick peaches. Climbing up and down the ladder with a heavy load of peaches, you learn the importance of an education.” said Valdivia.

Later that day he spoke at the Ninth Annual Cesar Chavez Day Celebration about the importance of learning the English language and work for an education.

What maybe is just as important for Anglos is to learn the Spanish language and work for an education.

Read more about the weekend tribute to the life of Cesar Chavez here.


Redding Heat Adds Win 21-3 over Thunder:

The “Redding Heat” places another win in the books last night 21-3 over the Yuba City Thunder.  This is the second win for the new 2011  franchise under owners Jayson Burris, Missy McArthur and Head Coach, Chris Hall.

Visit THE HEAT site for stats and schedule

Enjoy a few visual highlights from last nights game.

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Good Judgement:

GOOD JUDGEMENT COMES FROM EXPERIENCE, AND A LOT OF THAT COMES FROM BAD JUDGMENT.

-Will Rogers-


Sundial Film Festival viewing Saturday:

The Third annual Sundial Film Fesival will be held at the historic Cascade Theater in downtown Redding this Saturday.  I had the pleasure of spending time with three of the very talented filmmakers.  You can also view the version of the story here in the Record Searachlight and here in the Anderson Valley Post.

Jefferson Thomas, winner of Best Animation for "Rathale"

Inspiration for north state film makers is as distinct as the films they created for the third annual Sundial Film Festival. Creative ideas range from a toy snake; a 1929 Disney classic to a friend leaving the gas stove on.

It’s too early to say if changing the cities name to “Reddingwood” is a bit premature  given the areas visual talent, it is realistic to believe that film production could be a viable industry in a weak economy.

“The original objective of the event was to foster film and photography interest among our youth and this year is definite evidence of the festivals success, with large increases in both photography and film entries from our local schools and college level students.”said Mark Lascelles, Chairman of the Sundial Film Festival Organizing Committee.

For Palo Cedro resident Jefferson Thomas, winner of Best Animation for “Rathle”, his inspiration was generated by an animated conversation with his godson Nicholas Giedt while he played with a rubber snake purchased at Turtle Bay.

“It was truly a labor of love. It started out as a fun conversation and developed from there.” said Thomas of the 1 ½ year long production.

This was not unchartered territory for Thomas who is Art Director and Flash Animator at Jefferson Thomas Creative the company he owns and offers clients creative animation and interactive media solutions.

A graduate from Cal Arts in experimental animation he worked as an animation assistant for Colossal Pictures.  His interest in “stop motion” rewarded him with an internship at Skellington Productions the company that created Tim Burton’s Nightmare before Christmas.

“One of my goals is to find local opportunities  to teach the next generation of animators.” noted Thomas.

Ben Keeline is surrounded by his advance graphic design students.

The laughter was infectious as you walked into the darkened modular classroom.  Brightly colored, animated student names rolled up and down the computer monitors painting smiling faces.

Teaching the graphics design program at Cottonwood Creek Charter School has been Ben Keeline’s passion.  A native of Palo Cedro he has been teaching for fifteen years after obtaining his film degree from the University of Southern California.

Keeline and his first year students produced the animated film “Skeleton Dance” inspired by the 1929 Disney short Silly Symphony which he studied at USC.

“I felt it would be a good transition for students to first understand movement and storytelling. With future projects we will move on to characters with expression and finally dialog.”

The learning curve was fast for the students taking three months to produce the short film. The students learned the 3D figure design and animation software created by Poser.

“I credit Principal Mark Boyle with obtaining the software and seeing the educational value in the program. You never know how it may open avenues in the future for the students.” noted Keeline.

“I’m the computer person in the house. I worked on the coyote, rooster and dog in the film.” said a grinning Donald Leedy, 13, of Cottonwood.

Rayleen Quinonez, 14 of Cottonwood said “The things we learned by making the film were,  knowing your tools; sketching out the story frame-by-frame; having confidence and knowing that you can finish… ohh ya and patience.”

Filmmaker, Jeff Loveness”tumblr” profile reads; “Jeff is a comedy writer, director and actor of arguable quality.”  As a youngster growing up in Montgomery Creek, Jeff and his brother Clint who is now working as a filmmaker in Texas honed their craft at the early ages of five with backyard remakes of James Bond action adventures and Jurassic Park.

Jeff Loveness, actor and filmmaker druring a break on the hit television show "The Office".

The polite, soft spoken Loveness graduated a semester early this month from Pepperdine University and spoke during a phone interview about his film “Contact” which follows the challenges of a disheartened young man trying to commit suicide. 

“If I had any advice for a young film maker it’s to use the internet. Make the best short quality video possible and get it on line.”

Loveness was inspired to make the film after talking to a friend who had accidently left the gas flowing on the kitchen stove. He was drawn to the idea of how to visit a serious, somber subject as suicide in a humorous and respectful way.

“I feel very good about the movie and I’ve been overwhelmed by viewers on the internet reaching out and saying how it has helped them deal with the issue.  I didn’t want the film to be offending in any way. I respond to comedy, using it as a vehicle to plunge into darker material.” he said.

Loveness now plans to start making the rounds in Los Angeles looking for new acting rolls, adding to his resume.  Still finding it difficult to believe this past year he had speaking part in season seven, episode seven, titled Christening, of the hit show “The Office”.

“This will be the best group of films we have had the pleasure of showing. We have more variety this year with a growing participation from our schools. Our local professional photographers and film makers continue to support this event by entering excellent work. We look forward to seeing more exciting projects, as our local students leave and go on to professional film and photography careers taking them to many corners of the globe.” said Lascelles.

There were twenty-six movies reviewed by the LA Film Study Center who determined the festival winners The Sundial Film Festival viewing schedule held at Redding’s Cascade Theater is split between afternoon and evening sessions Saturday, March 19th starting at 1p.m. Tickets can be purchased for $11.50 and available at the theater.


Job? or bad taste?

Nothing seems to surprise me any more even after several months of unemployment.

Job post showing little sense or compassion.

SmartWork Media showed just how little smarts and compassion they have as a media organization by advertising a position in Thailand on JournalismJobs.com with the headline “LET’S SHAKE THINGS UP!

Wonderful idea after thousands have lost there lives in Japan and the country is facing the most significant nuclear disaster of our time. Good Job SMARTWORK MEDIA.


ARBOR DAY:

I never saw a discontented tree. They grip the ground as though they liked it, and though fast rooted they travel about as far as we do.
-John Muir-
Read about the trees in the Redding area (here)

Photo: Gary Miller/Special to the Record Searchlight


Painting Spring

WHEN YOU HAVE ONLY TWO PENNIES LEFT IN THE WORLD, BUY A LOAF OF BREAD WITH ONE, AND A LILY WITH THE OTHER.

-Chinese Proverb-

 

When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other.  ~Chinese Proverb


Our Best!

Cottonwood Cemetery Cottonwood, CA 2011
“America’s trying to do the best for its veterans. “
-R. Lee Ermey-


THE WORK OF CHARLES MOORE IN NY:

This is an amazing opportunity to view images that changed the worlds view of civil right in America.  Charles Moore was a man with a social conscience that used his camera when words had little meaning.  He forever changed what we know as documentary photojournalism.


A Second Chance to Help:

TODAY’S NEWS!

According to the latest jobs report, the unemployment rate fell to 8.9% — a nearly two-year low.

One of the benefits of working as a picture editor over the years is working with talented photojournalist that really seem to understand the importance of what documentary photography can mean to the world.

The impact that documentary projects can make in our continued search for social equality and the understanding of what that means on both a humanitarian and environmental level is enormous.

Much of the significant journalistic work being produced today is by freelance journalists who try to find creative ways to fund their projects.

For one friend and former colleague, Caitlin M. Kelly, a small goal has been reached but we have two weeks to continue with our support for this and future projects.  At a time when it is difficult to have faith in the economy when you can’t count on a future of employment, but…there is always an opportunity to put your faith in those who have a shared respect for those who walk our planet.

FUNDING FOR THIS PROJECT ENDS MARCH 19TH


The Missing Piece?

There are some things in life you can just count on.  There are some things that instinctively you know won’t be a good idea but life is about taking chances and searching for the element of surprise.

Purchasing a 500 piece puzzle at a discount store may offer the same outcome as a 400 pound climber making the Everest summit.  With every step, every piece of the puzzle you hold hope that one movement will lead to the next…and the next.

Through history there have been countless philosophers that have expounded on the importance of the journey and not the destination. Enlightenment is found on the path to the summit and not in reaching the summit.

It is obvious that they have never felt the pain of working days on a three dollar, 500 piece kitten puzzle and only to find the final piece missing on completion.

The final and missing piece.

“There are no extra pieces in the universe. Everyone is here because he or she has a place to fill, and every piece must fit itself into the big jigsaw puzzle.”

-Deepak Chopra-